Author Topic: Weight Bonus Ambiguity  (Read 2477 times)

adrian

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Weight Bonus Ambiguity
« on: July 26, 2015, 04:59:41 pm »
I'm thinking of building a propeller driven robot which would slide across the floor with no wheels, and was wondering what weight bonuses, if any, a non-wheeled, non-shuffling, non-walker robot would get. Under the Tournament Procedures v1.0, the categories are Walkers, Shufflers/novel non-wheeled robots, and everything else. I would either get either no weight bonus, or a 50% bonus, depending on if the event organizer determines I am a "novel non-wheeled robot." However, under the Robot Construction Specifications v1.0 section 4, it is seems to say that I would get a 100% weight bonus for having a non-wheeled robot. Also, walking, shuffling, hopping, flying, and hovering robots would seem count as a non-wheeled robot and get the 100% weight bonus, but also have their own categories. Can somebody clarify this? Can we update the next version of the rules to make this more clear?

Quote from: Robot Construction Specifications Section 4
There is a 100% weight bonus for non-wheeled robots (There may be a 50% weight bonus for shufflers or other forms
of locomotion which do not fall within the definition of non-wheeled robot - see 5.1.2 for
a definition of a non-wheeled robot.)

Quote from: Robot Construction Specifications Section 5.1
Methods of mobility include:
5.1.1. Rolling (wheels, tracks or the whole robot)
5.1.2. Non-wheeled: non-wheeled robots have no rolling elements in contact with
the floor and no continuous rolling or cam operated motion in contact with the
floor, either directly or via a linkage. Motion is “continuous” if continuous
operation of the drive motor(s) produces continuous motion of the robot.
Linear-actuated legs and novel non-wheeled drive systems may qualify for this
bonus. If you are intending to enter a non-wheeled robot in any event contact
the event as soon as possible to determine what if any weight bonus you will
qualify for.
5.1.3. Shuffling (rotational cam operated legs)
5.1.4. Ground effect air cushions (hovercrafts)
5.1.5. Jumping and hopping may be allowed at some events, contact the event
organizer if you’re intending on using this as a method of locomotion.
5.1.6. Flying (airfoil using, helium balloons, ornithopters, etc.)may be allowed at
some events, contact the event organizer if you’re intending on using this as a
method of locomotion.

Quote from: Tournament Procedures
Walkers may weigh up to 100% more than their standard class weight limit.

Walkers are those robots in which multiple linear or limited-travel rotary actuators are
intermittently driven to produce linear travel of the robot. Actuation may be through electric,
pneumatic, or hydraulic means. Walkers must have no parts normally in contact with the
ground undergoing continuous rotation, and must require some change in timing or
sequencing of the driving mechanisms in order to reverse direction. Walkers will typically
have control systems significantly more complex than those found on shufflers or rollers,
involving multiple actuators, servos, or valves running through a specific sequence to
produce motion.

Shufflers and novel non-wheeled robots may weigh up to 50% more than their standard
class weight limit. (Option: Shufflers and novel non-wheeled robots receive no weight
bonus)

If a robot is supported and/or propelled by parts that do not normally undergo continuous
unrestrained rotation around a horizontal axis, but uses a system of mechanical devices
such as cams or crankshafts to generate reciprocating motion of those parts from one or
more continuously rotating drive shafts, it will be considered a shuffler. The defining feature
of a shuffler (versus a walker) will be the ability to generate continual forward motion of the
robot from continual rotation of its drive motors. Shufflers typically have electrical control
systems indistinguishable from those on wheeled robots.

Any other form of locomotion that is not contained within wheeled, walking, or shuffling is
considered a novel non-wheeled form of locomotion. If you are intending on building a robot
that may fall under this classification contact the event(s) that you plan on attending with the
robot to confirm what they will classify the drive system as and what, if any weight bonus
will be allowed.

« Last Edit: July 26, 2015, 05:13:26 pm by adrian »

MikeNCR

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Re: Weight Bonus Ambiguity
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2015, 10:26:58 pm »
If you're talking about building a No Fly Zone style prop driven bot, it would get no weight bonus as the steering mechanism uses a wheel. If it were built to not have a wheel used for turning (a second prop or similar) it would likely qualify for the 50% weight bonus.

adrian

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Re: Weight Bonus Ambiguity
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2015, 10:47:20 pm »
Yep, I'm talking about a bot with two props, and no wheels. I think I'm pretty clearly in the Non-Wheeled Robot category, the two documents just conflict on how much weight bonus I get.

MikeNCR

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Re: Weight Bonus Ambiguity
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2015, 10:55:54 pm »
Yep, I'm talking about a bot with two props, and no wheels. I think I'm pretty clearly in the Non-Wheeled Robot category, the two documents just conflict on how much weight bonus I get.

Then you should contact the event you're planning to attend as the rules state.

daggius

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Re: Weight Bonus Ambiguity
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2016, 02:59:10 pm »
Found this video of an awesome hovercraft bot

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUIEkwqtW1c

well slider bot really